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More than a Game: Harnessing the power of sport to transform the lives of disadvantaged young people

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Sports clubs are a vital thread in the fabric of our society, while across the UK, there are organisations and individuals that are making the most of sport’s ability to inspire people to achieve things they had never thought possible. It is this last potential of sport – its social power – that led the CSJ (centre for social justice) to commission this report. Our Working Group has drawn on the evidence gathered from leading practitioners, its own experience and from the conversations held over the last 18 months with some of the most influential people in British sport. A set of recommendations has emerged which, if implemented, will radically alter our ability to harness sport as a tool for social good.

Vitally, the report draws a firm distinction between the promotion of sport in a generalised way and the clear, logical steps we need to harness it as a recognised and reliable feature of social policy. We argue that this distinction, which has long been apparent to both practitioners and researchers, needs to be enshrined in the way we fund and view sport as an area of public policy. By handing lead responsibility for sport to tackle social problems to the Department for Education, we recommend radical political and governance reform. Experts in particular fields, such as crime reduction, the fight against childhood obesity and the use of sport in education would remain autonomous, but under this proposal ministers and officials would be equipped to use sport as a powerful route out of poverty.

In the report we also set out how the promise of a world-leading coaching system can finally be fulfilled. Crucial to this is the persuasive case for investment in our coaches – the people who deliver sport to so many thousands of young people in Britain.

Finally, More than a Game expresses concern about the likely sporting legacy of the London 2012 Olympic Games – a type of legacy no other host city has ever achieved – despite lauding the ambition of those who seek to deliver a lasting increase in participation.

Sport can do more. It can achieve some of the social outcomes that will help, even transform, our society.’

Michael de Giorgio
CSJ Sport Working Group Chairman

  

sportdevelopment.org.uk

 

 

 editors comments   

Editor's comments - [  This is the final report of the Centre for Social Justice’s (CSJ) Sport Review which investigates how to harness the power of sport to transform the lives of disadvantaged young people. This report, More than a Game, seeks to examine the use of sport as a tool to engage and work with young people in our most deprived communities. Britain is a famously enthusiastic sporting nation, with millions of people participating in sport a week and hundreds of thousands attending professional sports matches. For three weeks in August 2012 (notwithstanding the paralympic games), this fact will be attested to, as London becomes the first city to host the Olympic Games three times (2012).  ]  Reference this?Cryer, J. (Year). This page title in italics. Retrieved date, from <this page's full URL>

In the text: Cryer (year)

 

APA reference for this document

 

Reference :   CSJ (2011). More than a Game: Harnessing the power of sport to transform the lives of disadvantaged young people. London: Centre for Social Justice

 

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Download this file (20110523-csj-more-than-a-game-web.pdf)20110523-csj-more-than-a-game-web.pdfCSJ (2011). More than a Game: Harnessing the power of sport to transform the lives of disadvantaged young people. London: Centre for Social Justice
Last Updated on Saturday, 14 April 2012 15:18