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Hello! Are you listening?: Disabled teenagers’ experience of access to inclusive leisure

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Leisure is an important aspect of our lives allowing us to expand our horizons through the development of our interests, whilst at the same time giving us the opportunity to meet and interact with others holding similar interests. We are likely to make new friends through our leisure pursuits just as we are likely to spend our leisure time with established friends. In addition to giving us possibilities of developing relationships, leisure is recognised as giving us opportunities to follow our interests, to push ourselves to new physical, social and psychological limits. An important feature of our leisure time is that we have the opportunity to engage in activities that make us happy, so developing our self-esteem, confidence, emotional and psychological well-being.

Leisure takes on an additional significance for disabled people who generally do not experience an ease of access into mainstream education or work. Barriers to full and equal participation in these areas result in young disabled people both having more time for leisure pursuits whilst simultaneously experiencing greater difficulty in accessing leisure services, activities and pastimes (Aitchison, 2000; Petrie et al., 2000). Leisure, therefore, is identified as a key area through which to build bridges towards the inclusion of young disabled people within the mainstream.

  

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 editors comments   

Editor's comments - [  This exploration of leisure, specifically ‘access to inclusive leisure’, is firmly placed within the context of recent legislation such as the Disability Discrimination Act, 1995; the Human Rights Act, 1998; and Valuing People: A New Strategy for Learning Disability for the 21st Century (HMSO, 2001). Policy initiatives such as the Quality Protects Programme (England), Children First (Wales) and the Framework for Social Justice (Scotland) all aim to bridge the gap between legislative aspirations and the daily experience of vulnerable young people. Such legislation and policy initiatives clearly state that disabled young people have the right to be included in the mainstream and that the move from provision that excludes to provision that includes is an essential aspect of a caring society.  ]  Reference this?Cryer, J. (Year). This page title in italics. Retrieved date, from <this page's full URL>

In the text: Cryer (year)

 

APA reference for this document

 

Reference : Murray, P. (2002). Hello! Are you listening?: Disabled teenagers’ experience of access to inclusive leisure. York: Joseph Rowntree Foundation

 

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Download this file (1842630873.pdf)1842630873.pdfMurray, P. (2002). Hello! Are you listening?: Disabled teenagers’ experience of access to inclusive leisure. York: Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Last Updated on Sunday, 29 November 2009 07:15