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Can we have our ball back please? Rising inactivity levels in Great Britain’s youth and the impact on elite football.

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A survey by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) indicated that football is the most popular sport in schools in Great Britain (DCMS, 2004). If this is the case, then there should be little or no problem for football clubs to select quality players from a seemingly growing pool of talent. With this situation in mind the authors set out to discuss the current state of football development in place, in Great Britain by considering the range and types of opportunities available for young people, aged 9 to 19 years old, to play football towards elite level. In recent years the opportunities for young people to play elite football have been modelled on a system of Long Term Athlete Development (LTAD, Balyi, 2004) taken up by the Academies and Centres of Excellence for coaching football. The success of this long-term approach to developing sporting talent will be questioned and contrasted with the concerning rise of inactivity levels of children in Great Britain (BBC Sport, 2005a).

  

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 editors comments   

Editor's comments - [  Although in 2007, Team GB have not yet ruled out competing in football at the 2008 Beijing Olympics, the 2012 London Olympics will most likely be the first time that Great Britain has entered a men’s football team into an Olympic competition since 1972; after the distinction between “professional” and “amateur” footballers was abolished in 1974 (The Football Association, 2004). By looking to this competition, success will be measured by whether Great Britain can achieve a medal. This essay questions whether that success can be attained, given that the talent pool of potential players has alarming indications of rising inactivity levels across Great Britain. ]  Reference this?Cryer, J. (Year). This page title in italics. Retrieved date, from <this page's full URL>

In the text: Cryer (year)

 

APA reference for this document

 

Reference : Kenyon, J. and Palmer, C. (2007) Can we have our ball back please? Rising inactivity levels in Great Britain’s youth and the impact on elite football. Journal of Qualitative Research in Sports Studies. 1, 1, 69-75.

 

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Download this file (JQRSS_7_Kenyon%20and%20Palmer%2069-75.pdf)JQRSS_7_Kenyon%20and%20Palmer%2069-75.pdfKenyon, J. and Palmer, C. (2007) Can we have our ball back please? Rising inactivity levels in Great Britain’s youth and the impact on elite football. Journal of Qualitative Research in Sports Studies. 1, 1, 69-75.
Last Updated on Tuesday, 08 September 2009 05:37