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Learning to play and playing to learn: Organized sports and educational outcomes

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On any given afternoon, in school gymnasia, playing fields and running tracks across the country [USA], the sounds of balls being hit by bats, rackets, feet, sticks and basket rims punctuate the noise from runners racing around 400-meter tracks, high jumpers flopping onto pads, swimmers diving into pools, wrestlers slamming into mats, and more. These are the sounds of America’s youth involved in organized sports, and a vast body of research demonstrates that it is not just athletic prowess that these youngsters are developing.

This report is the first of a series of monographs designed to explore what is known about the healthy development we seek for children and youth, and how participation in sportsbased youth development activities can contribute to reaching this goal. With increasing public pressure to concentrate on student achievement, we focus this first report on the educational benefits of youth participation in organized sports activities.

 

sportdevelopment.org.uk

 

 

editors comments

Editor's comments - [  These reports are designed to stimulate discussion and action to strengthen sports-based youth development programs [in the USA] and ensure that children and youth who are currently underserved — especially low-income children, children of color, and girls — gain the benefits of participating in them. Through these monographs, Team-Up for Youth synthesizes lessons from the literature and presents them to the field so that practitioners can use them to advance their work and improve outcomes for the young people they serve.  ]  Reference this?Cryer, J. (Year). This page title in italics. Retrieved date, from. In the text: Cryer (year)

 

APA reference for this document

 

Reference : Rosewater, A. (2009). Learning to play and playing to learn: Organized sports and educational outcomes. Oakland, CA: Team-up for youth

 

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Download this file (learningtoplay.pdf)learningtoplay.pdfRosewater, A. (2009). Learning to play and playing to learn: Organized sports and educational outcomes. Oakland, CA: Team-up for youth
Last Updated on Sunday, 10 February 2013 09:00