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Using 'sport in the community schemes' to tackle crime and drug use among young people: some policy issues and problems

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In Britain, as in many other western societies, there has been over the last two or three decades growing concern over what has been described as 'widespread drug use amongst very large numbers . . . of young people' (Parker et al., 1998: 1).

In particular, concern has been expressed about the use of illegal recreational drugs such as cannabis and 'harder' drugs such as cocaine, as well as the many and various kinds of criminal behaviour said to be associated with drug use  Boreham and McManus, 2003; Condon and Smith, 2003). This concern has manifested itself in a number of ways, not least in the emergence of a plethora of policy initiatives designed to combat social problems of this kind. Among these initiatives have been policies based on the assumption that the provision of sport and physical activities can make an important contribution to reducing crime and drug use amongst young people, a view which has been articulated in several policy statements since the early 1960s.

Set in this context, the objects of this article are:

(i) to offer some critical comments on the policy issues and problems surrounding the increasing adoption of sporting schemes - in particular, 'sport in the community schemes' — as vehicles of social policy targeted at reducing levels of crime, delinquency and drug 'abuse' among young people (see e.g. DCMS, 1999, 2000; DCMS/Strategy Unit, 2002; Sport England, 1999, 2002); and

(ii) to examine a point of fundamental importance in policy terms: do such schemes work?

  

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 editors comments   

Editor's comments - [  This article seeks, first, to offer some critical comments on the policy issues and problems surrounding the use of sporting schemes as vehicles of social policy in which the intention is to reduce levels of crime, delinquency and drug 'abuse' among young people; second, to examine a point of fundamental importance in policy terms: do such schemes work? In this regard, it is claimed that relatively few of such schemes - which are largely premised upon a one-sided perception of sport - have built in processes for monitoring and evaluating their impact on levels of crime or drug use among young people. It is also argued that these methodological weaknesses are exacerbated by the absence of any clearly articulated theoretical rationale for these schemes, which means that, even where success for them is claimed, it is unclear what specific aspects of the schemes account for that claimed success.  ]  Reference this?Cryer, J. (Year). This page title in italics. Retrieved date, from <this page's full URL>

In the text: Cryer (year)

 

APA reference for this document

 

Reference : Smith,A. Waddington,I. (2007) Using 'sport in the community schemes' to tackle crime and drug use among young people: some policy issues and problems. Chester: University of Chester

 

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Last Updated on Wednesday, 29 April 2009 17:35