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Football and families. Fact Sheet 14

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Football is now seen as a much more accessible sport for adults with children, if one which, at the highest levels, is now also in danger of pricing itself out of pockets of some potential spectators including parents. The sport is no longer dominated by images of machismo, tribalism and violent rivalries as it tended to be in the 1970s and 1980s.

Today, football in Britain is more widely identified with broader forms of community inclusion – accessible to women and girls, attracting more minority ethnic fans, child and family friendly and a central focus for specific forms of consumption and community solidarity and identity. But it also excludes some families because of cost and restricted access.

In addition to these changes, parents and other relatives who now take kids to football matches in England and Scotland, suggest that football is, at least in some households, an important cultural and social location where family and parenting relationships can be cemented and explored.

  

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 editors comments   

Editor's comments - [  The author draws on “interviews with adults who take children to football matches today. They span supporters of larger clubs to followers of very small Football League clubs. See Williams and Neatrour (2001) for a more detailed version of this research.  ]  Reference this?Cryer, J. (Year). This page title in italics. Retrieved date, from <this page's full URL>

In the text: Cryer (year)

 

APA reference for this document

 

Reference : Lowrey, J. (2002). Football and families. Fact Sheet 14. Leicester: Sir Norman Chester Centre for Football Research. University of Leicester

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Last Updated on Saturday, 14 March 2009 13:39